LATEST JOBS IN JAPAN 2022

LATEST JOBS IN JAPAN 2022

Japan

LATEST JOBS IN JAPAN 2022

LATEST JOBS IN JAPAN 2022
LATEST JOBS IN JAPAN 2022

in 2018. However, jumping ship can be risky in Japan, particularly for those aged over 40. In addition, a record number of young employees are quitting their jobs at major companies within three years of starting work. That figure has risen to 26.5 percent, up from 20.5 percent eight years ago.

Job roles

The Japanese government has announced ambitious sustainability targets, including doubling renewable energy by 2030 and a net-zero society by 2050. As a result, the country has made large investments in the ESG (Environment, Social, and Governance) sector, spurring hypergrowth and demand for talent. The demand for Engineering roles is particularly high in the renewable energy industry, as the country is seeking to become more environmentally friendly.

The most convenient ways to find a job in Japan are through career websites such as GaijinPot, as well as networking with people in the industry. Although networking is still less important than in other countries, many companies in the industry prefer applicants who are fluent in Japanese and English. Wantedly and TokyoDev are two newer job boards that can help you find a position that suits your skills. However, it’s essential to know how to communicate your skills and highlight your point of value.

SUBMIT CV HERE
SUBMIT CV HERE

Locations

There are many job opportunities in Japan. You can find a variety of roles in various sectors such as manufacturing, engineering, healthcare, and more. To apply, you must have legal residence status in Japan that allows you to work. If you’re not a native Japanese speaker, you may not have the skills needed for some of these jobs. You can, however, apply for high-demand areas without a Japanese language background.

English teachers are needed in the Ikeshita area of Nagoya. The position requires full-time commitments with 40 hours of teaching a week. In return, you can earn between two hundred thousand and three hundred thousand yen (US dollars) per month. You’ll also be able to get paid holidays, vacation, and health insurance. As an added bonus, you can get a driver’s license and Skype address.

SUBMIT CV HERE
SUBMIT CV HERE

Compensation

As the number of workers looking for new job opportunities in Japan grows, many employers are beginning to offer better compensation. In addition, Japanese companies are investing heavily in brand building and employee benefits. While this can be costly, it can also attract top talent. Moreover, Japanese employees are expected to work hard to maintain their job security. In return, they can expect to enjoy pensions, bonuses, and promotions based on seniority.

While the pay scale in Japan may be similar to that of the west, Japanese companies are notorious for giving their employees higher-than-average bonuses. These bonuses are typically a proportion of the total compensation package, and range anywhere from 2% to 7% of yearly salary. Employees of foreign-owned companies may see an initial reduction in their cash flow before bonuses kick in. Additionally, many companies may face less success in recruiting and retaining top talent due to the low pay of their employees.

Working from home

The Japanese work model has long been the bedrock of the country’s economic success, and companies have been whittling away at it for decades. But there are still challenges to telework, from organizational structure to security concerns. For example, many workers are afraid they’ll be disadvantaged if they don’t toil long hours at the office. And in 2022, with the spread of the Omicron variant, telework rates may be even higher.

The Japanese government’s COVID-19 state of emergency triggered a rapid shift towards work from home, but the telework trend failed to last. Despite the benefits of remote work, the country is still reluctant to embrace it because of its rigid working structures. Keio University’s Panel Data Research Center keeps track of household trends in the country through the ongoing Japan Household Panel Survey. The research team found that the number of people working from home in Japan is only 20% – only a few percentage points higher than what it was in 2010.

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